Training Resource - Activities, Exercises & Assessment Ideas


Welcome to the Public Parkland Planning and Design guide training package. This training is a reference document for lecturers, tutors and trainers to guide conversation about best practice delivery of public open space in Western Australia.

 This training material provides;
- A selection of activities which can be used during workshops/tutorials or can be used for assessments.
- Links to relevant source material, background information, tools and research that will assist you in lecture planning and delivery and to support students completing the activities.
The activities and resources are aligned with the sections of the Public Parkland Planning and Design Guide and can be read alongside one another. 

This training aims to facilitate and nurture enthusiastic advocates for high quality, well-activated, sustainable parkland systems that meet diverse community needs and expectations. 

 

Activity 1.1 – Assess Water Management Plans
Activity Objective
To consider a water management plan in the context of sport, recreation, or community interests. 
The use of POS for water management is generally encouraged as it presents an opportunity to integrate engineering requirements into the landscape, keep water close to its source and use storm water to irrigate open space and may result in a larger amount of green space available to the community. 
Activity Context
- You work for a local government that has received an urban water management plan as a component of a structure plan application and you have been asked to assess it and provide feedback.
- You have access to the local and regional water management plans/strategies relevant to the area of the site in question
- The structure plan application is yet to be approved by the Western Australian Planning Commission
- In this exercise you are not required to assess the water management plan for water quality improvement, flood prevention or water management purposes – you are only required to assess its impact on the publically accessible spaces and its use for sport, access to nature or recreation.
Activity resources/references
- Better Urban Water Management, Department of Planning 
- The Stormwater Management Manual for Western Australia, Department of Water
- An Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP), and associated local/regional water management plans/strategies.
Activity
Read a UWMP and its associated planning document and answer the following questions:
- Identify all the public open space identified for use for water management purposes – are the functions of these areas (sport, nature, recreation) compatible with use for water management? Compare the water management plans with the public open space plan if available.
- Identify all water management infrastructure proposed on public open space – are these likely to hinder use of the reserve by the community? Are they adequately integrated into the space and in keeping with use of the site by the community?
- Compare the proposal with the principles of WSUD – is it generally in keeping with these principles? Can you identify the structural controls being proposed? 
- Can you identify three questions that you would ask the developer/engineer? – e.g. aspects to clarify to ensure that the best outcome for the community is achieved.


Activity 1.2 – Write a Local Government Parkland Policy
Activity Objective
- Write a POS policy to implement an existing POS strategy or to act on its own in lieu of a more strategic approach.
- The POS policy should take in to account all existing strategic planning and state government policy and allow for its effective implementation. The POS Policy should take state government POS planning legislation and prepare the local government to respond to requests when asked and to ensure implementation is locally appropriate.
Activity Context
- You are a Local government planning officer who is preparing a POS Policy.
- You should consider how other existing policies, which the Local Government have, as formatted to ensure you match their requirements.
- Local Government planning policies are generally used in responding to planning applications (requests for approval) and when responding to the Department of Planning on structure plan and subdivision proposals.
Activity resources/references
- Introduction to the Planning system for Sport and Rec professionals, Department of Sport and Recreation
- Classification Framework for Public Open Spac, Department of Sport and Recreation
- POS Strategy Guide for Local Governments, Department of Sport and Recreatio
Activity
- Prepare a draft POS policy that is ready to go out for preliminary public consultation/ or to council for permission to do so.
- Identify any consultation required and how you would go about doing this.
- Make use of the step by step guide to developing a POS strategy to consider aspects that could be covered by the policy.
Assessment criteria
Ensure the provision of equitable access to nature, sport and recreation opportunities throughout the local government area
Does the policy ensure that community needs are considered throughout the planning process? E.g. conducting a supply and demand analysis to identify need (what, where, how much). The approach should consider projected demographics, population growth or decline, demographic profile, housing densities (including access to private open space), their day-to-day movements to access to essential infrastructure (public transport, activity centres);
Include mechanisms to consider and establish neighbourhood identity by identifying natural and cultural features that contribute to the local landscape character; 
Enable the creation of a continuous POS network at a district scale by implementing any identifying potential networks of connected or linear open space for walking and cycling
Implement any public open space identified in areas where the land is unlikely to be subject to structure planning, to ensure that piecemeal subdivisions do not result in a fragmented public open space network
Consider interaction with integrated water cycle management. Consider any available documents such as district/regional water management strategies, water supply strategies, water license availability and/or stormwater management planning in coordination with the Department of Water. Consider how the policy deals with situations where a POS site is used for water management, how does it deal with infrastructure requirements and impact on the function of the site?
Does the policy assist in the delivery of district/regional scale sporting facilities or recreational spaces and facilitate the formal acquisition of this land or re-zoning, where appropriate?
Consider the interaction of this policy with any Local Biodiversity Planning or environmental policy requirements;
Consider how shared use/co-location of open space (e.g. ovals and schools), and facilities is dealt with. Are there appropriate procedures and management requirements?
Are minimum land size and development requirements identified to ensure that parks are developed to a minimum standard to enhance residential amenity and to ensure functions identified in planning are fulfilled? e.g. playgrounds, shade, shelter, drinking fountains, seating, footpaths/boardwalks. 
Are asset costs, maintenance requirements, and whole of life costs fully considered? Identify handover and audit procedures to ensure infrastructure functions as intended?
Does the policy identify the roles, responsibilities and contributions required from the State, local government and proponents?
Articulate procedures relating to public open space development plans, and landscaping plans to ensure that agreements are met throughout the planning, development and maintenance of sites

Activity 1.3 – Assess a Local Government Parkland Policy
Activity Objective
Critically review a Local Government Parkland/POS policy on its ability to adequately guide the delivery of quality public open space in the locality. 
Local governments creating new or reviewing old public open space local planning policy, or undertaking strategic planning is a great opportunity to ensure than sport and recreation interests are fully considered and implemented. POS/parkland policies are often used by local governments to implement a strategic plan.
Activity Context
- You have been given the task of reviewing a POS policy, the example provided could be a finalised document however you may be looking to recommend a review of the document or can use the same process if you where asked to provide comments on a draft policy. 
- In this exercise you are not required to review the documents that support the policy, such as a strategic plan/ POS strategy, just the policy itself. However, you may wish to make recommendations if you deem them necessary.
- Assume that you are providing feedback to the local government custodian of the document.
Activity resources/references
- Introduction to planning for the sport and recreation professional, Department of Sport and Recreation
- Classification Framework for POS, Department of Sport and Recreation
- POS/Parkland policy example
- Any strategic planning documents related to the policy used such as a POS strategy, local government planning strategy etc. Look for vision and objectives relating to delivery of public open space or community facilities to find relevant documents.
Activity
- Read the POS/Parkland Policy and critically assess how well it implements any existing strategy and;
Check alignment with the DSR classification framework terminology. See Classification Framework for Public Open Space (DSR, 2012) for further information.
Refer to the POS Strategy Guide for Local Governments on the DSR website for further guidance which provides a step-by-step procedure to drafting a POS strategy. The POS policy is the implementation of these outcomes so consideration is necessary. 

Identify where the policy could be enhanced (not all of these are practical or achievable for every local government POS policy but are worth considered as a part of this process);
- Ensure the provision of equitable access to nature, sport and recreation opportunities throughout the local government area. Does the policy ensure that community needs are considered throughout the planning process? E.g. conducting a supply and demand analysis to identify need (what, where, how much).

- The approach should consider projected demographics, population growth or decline, demographic profile, housing densities (including access to private open space), their day-to-day movements to access to essential infrastructure (public transport, activity centres);

- Include mechanisms to consider and establish neighbourhood identity by identifying natural and cultural features that contribute to the local landscape character;

- Enable the creation of a continuous POS network at a district scale by implementing any identifying potential networks of connected or linear open space for walking and cycling;

- Implement any public open space identified in areas where the land is unlikely to be subject to structure planning, to ensure that piecemeal subdivisions do not result in a fragmented public open space network;

- Consider interaction with integrated water cycle management. Consider any available documents such as district/regional water management strategies, water supply strategies, water license availability and/or stormwater management planning in coordination with the Department of Water. Consider how the policy deals with situations where a POS site is used for water management, how does it deal with infrastructure requirements and impact on the function of the site?

- Does the policy assist in the delivery of district/regional scale sporting facilities or recreational spaces and facilitate the formal acquisition of this land or re-zoning, where appropriate?

- Consider the interaction of this policy with any Local Biodiversity Planning or environmental policy requirements;

- Consider how shared use/co-location of open space (e.g. ovals and schools), and facilities is dealt with. Are there appropriate procedures and management requirements?

- Are minimum land size and development requirements identified to ensure that parks are developed to a minimum standard to enhance residential amenity and to ensure functions identified in planning are fulfilled? e.g. playgrounds, shade, shelter, drinking fountains, seating, footpaths/boardwalks. 

- Are asset costs, maintenance requirements, and whole of life costs fully considered? Identify handover and audit procedures to ensure infrastructure functions as intended?

- Does the policy identify the roles, responsibilities and contributions required from the State, local government and proponents?

- Articulate procedures relating to public open space development plans, and landscaping plans to ensure that agreements are met throughout the planning, development and maintenance of sites



Activity 1.4 – Explore the planning system hierarchy
Activity Objective
Explore the Western Australian planning system to identify where parks and recreation factors can be implemented, issues raised or influence made.
The planning system is the premier way of influencing decision making regarding public open space, by understanding the planning system you are able to influence the process to produce the best results of the community, at the right time, at the right scale and with the right decision maker.

Activity Context
You are an advocate of great public open space outcomes and wish to influence the delivery of open space. This is a thought exercise in identifying where, when and what aspects of parkland planning best practice can be delivered. 

Activity resources/references
- Introduction to the planning system for Sport and Recreation Professionals – Department of Sport and Recreation (2010)
- The Department of Planning website
- Liveable Neighbourhoods 2009

Activity
Create a basic flow diagram (or similar) to show the planing system hierachy– identify decision makers, spheres of influence, appropriate factors for discussion and fill in any strategic documents that can influence these stages.

Identify gaps, and oppourtunities and report on these - consider roles and responsibilities, ongoing implementation and the likely impact on the delivery of parks and recreation into the future.